John Antle

Professor
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Office: 541-737-1425

Ballard Extension Hall

Ballard Extension Hall 307F

2591 SW Campus Way

2591 SW Campus Way
Corvallis, OR 97331

Current research focuses on the sustainability of agricultural systems in industrialized and developing countries, including climate change impacts, adaptation and mitigation in agriculture; assessment of environmental and social impacts of agricultural technologies; and geologic carbon sequestration.

The Agricultural Model Inter-comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP)

AgMIP is a global community of science aiming to improve agricultural system science and its use in climate impact assessment and analysis of pathways to sustainable agricultural development. As a co-principal investigator of AgMIP, John Antle works with the other co-PIs (Cynthia Rosenzweig of Columbia University and NASA/GISS, James Jones of University of Florida, and Jerry Hatfield of USDA Agricultural Research Service) to organize and lead AgMIP's activities. As the leader of AgMIP’s Regional Economics Team, John Antle led the economics component of a 3-year project funded by the UK Department for International Development in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia (see agmip.org), and contributed to the development of a handbook on methods for integrated assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation (http://www.agmip.org/regional-integrated-assessments-handbook/#).

Curriculum Vitae: 

Profile Field Tabs

At OSU
Affiliated with: 
Applied Economics
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John Antle is currently teaching annually a PhD field course in the Applied Economics Graduate Program, AEC 640 Sustainable Development. In addition, he has co-developed with collaborators a course on the use of the TOA-MD model. This course includes a User Guide, a set of Learning Modules, and technical documentation for self-guided use. This material is available free to researchers with the model software at the Tradeoff Analysis Project web site (tradeoffs.oregonstate.edu). The web site presents a map showing the global locations of over 400 individuals and institutions that are “registered users” of the TOA-MD software, meaning that they have completed at least the Basic Learning Module, and agreed to the Terms of Use.

Since 2012 the Tradeoff Analysis Project team has offered a 1-week in person workshop at Oregon State University which has been attended by about 20 economists and other scientists from around the world (for details see http://tradeoffs.oregonstate.edu/second-annual-global-toa-md-workshop), as well as training to about 25 economists in the AgMIP Regional Teams in Africa and South Asia (see agmip.org). In 2014, a course on “Crop-Livestock Systems Modeling for Ex Ante Impact Assessment using the TOA-MD and Ruminant Models,” was offered jointly with Mario Herrero, a leading livestock modeler at CSIRO-Australia. This course was designed for economists and scientists who are part of research teams at CGIAR centers with projects on crop-livestock systems. About 20 economists and livestock scientists from 6 CGIAR research programs participated in the course and a week-long workshop at ILRI in Addis Ababa.

Biography

John Antle is a professor in the Department of Applied Economics at Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, and a University Fellow at Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C. He received the Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 1980, and was formerly a professor at UC Davis and Montana State University. He has served as a senior staff economist for the President's Council of Economic Advisers in Washington, D.C. (1989-90); as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Agriculture (1991 97); and was a lead and contributing author to the IPCC third and fourth assessment reports. He is a Fellow and past President of the American Agricultural Economics Association. His current research focuses on the sustainability of agricultural systems in industrialized and developing countries, including climate change impacts, adaptation and mitigation in agriculture; assessment of environmental and social impacts of agricultural technologies; and geologic carbon sequestration.

Many of his research projects are related to the Tradeoff Analysis Project. He is also co-leading the Economics Team of the Agricultural Model Inter-comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP).